INTERNATIONAL

BRAE AREA DECOMMISSIONING

Marathon Oil is continuing the planning for the decommissioning of the Brae Area facilities in the UK sector of the central North Sea.

Decommissioning is a natural step in the life cycle of an oil and gas field. Marathon Oil began initial planning and evaluation of decommissioning the Brae Area facilities in 2009. Through hard work and innovative thinking, Marathon Oil has extended the life of the field significantly beyond initial projections. However, the inevitable decline in reservoir performance is a reality. Decommissioning is a complex and time consuming process, and industry experience shows that early planning can support extended production even further and ultimately reduce overall costs.

Summary brochure

The Brae Area lies approximately 170 miles (274 km) north-east of Aberdeen in a water depth of approximately 110m. The Area consists of three fixed jacket platforms, three Marathon Oil operated subsea tie-backs and numerous pipelines and subsea components. Third parties also use the Brae Area facilities.

Brae Alpha commenced production in 1983, Brae Bravo in 1988 and East Brae in 1993. The Central and West Brae/Sedgwick subsea tie-backs to Brae Alpha commenced production in 1989 and 1997 respectively. The Braemar subsea tie-back to East Brae commenced in 2003.

Liquids from the Brae Area are exported via the Forties pipeline to Cruden Bay, and then on to Kinneil near Grangemouth. Gas is transported via the Scottish Area Gas Evacuation (SAGE) pipeline to St. Fergus.

Before decommissioning work can proceed, the Decommissioning Programmes must be approved by the regulatory bodies, following engagement with all stakeholders.

In the UK sector of the North Sea, there is a clearly defined regulatory regime controlling the decommissioning of offshore oil and gas installations. Under the Petroleum Act 1998, as amended by the Energy Act 2008, it is a requirement to decommission offshore facilities at the end of their producing life.

Before decommissioning work can proceed, the operator must submit a Decommissioning Programme for approval by the regulatory bodies. This follows extensive engagement with stakeholders and the conclusion of numerous supporting studies. Decommissioning Programmes are considered on a case-by-case basis by the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS), who are responsible for ensuring compliance with the Petroleum Act.

The UK’s international obligations on decommissioning are governed principally by the 1992 Convention for the Protection of the Marine Environment of the North East Atlantic (OSPAR Convention). BEIS is the competent authority on decommissioning in the UK for OSPAR purposes.

The scope of the Decommissioning Programme must also satisfy requirements of other regulatory authorities, for example the Health and Safety Executive, Scottish Environment Protection Agency (Scotland) / Environment Agency (England) and Oil and Gas Authority.

Marathon Oil has participated in open and transparent engagement with stakeholders as part of the process to identify the most appropriate options for the decommissioning of the Brae Area infrastructure.

Stakeholder engagement is an integral part of decommissioning and Marathon Oil is committed to continuing clear and open communication throughout the process. Marathon Oil will fully comply with regulation, whilst balancing the inputs from stakeholders.

The Decommissioning Programmes and associated documents have been developed in accordance with relevant legislation and are based on assessments of the safety, technical, environmental, socio-economic and financial aspects of decommissioning. These documents are available for download below. If you have any questions on the Decommissioning Progammes please refer to the FAQs. Further queries or comments can be submitted using the feedback form.

Marathon Oil is committed to ensuring compliance with the Supply Chain Code of Practice through the values of fairness and trust. Once the decommissioning contracting phase commences, the Company will engage proactively with the supply chain to identify safe, environmentally sound and cost-effective solutions in line with the demands of the Brae Area Decommissioning Programmes.

Decommissioning Programmes

Decommissioning Programmes present the scope of work to be completed and the timeframe in which to comply with the Petroleum Act 1998, as amended by the Energy Act 2008. The scope of the Brae Area is considerable, including three fixed steel jacket platforms, three Marathon Oil operated subsea tie-backs and numerous pipelines and subsea components.

The Decommissioning Programmes have been developed based on extensive and wide reaching studies and assessments that have been used to evaluate the appropriate options for dealing with the oil and gas infrastructure. Validated assessment techniques that capture safety, environmental, socio economic, technical and economic factors have been used to develop a balanced and appropriate decommissioning solution.

The Decommissioning Programmes:

  • Provide an overview of the work to be completed to decommission the infrastructure and the timeframe in which to comply with the regulatory requirements
  • Define the shape, size, configuration and interdependencies of the assets
  • Include input from key stakeholders and must be approved by regulatory bodies

The Decommissioning Programmes are supported by an environmental assessment, which is an appraisal of the potential environmental impacts associated with the Project. This is documented within an Environmental Statement.

Once the scope of work detailed in the Decommissioning Programmes has been completed, a seabed survey will be completed to verify the scope has been accomplished. Supplementary and ongoing monitoring of any equipment left in place will continue, as required by the Petroleum Act.

Maps

Map of Marathon Oil's Brae Area overall layout thumbnail

Map of Marathon Oil's Brae Area Details and Installations thumbnail


Health, Environment and Safety

Marathon Oil regards environmental stewardship as a key corporate responsibility and has conducted studies and assessments significantly beyond the minimum requirement to better understand the short-, medium- and long-term environmental impacts of the decommissioning proposals being put forward. This additional effort reinforces the conclusions and proposals that Marathon Oil have put forward in the decommissioning plans. Full details are available within the Decommissioning Programmes and associated Environmental Statements.

Safety is paramount to Marathon Oil’s operations. Safety studies have formed a core part of the comparative assessment process and have involved the identification of the hazards associated with the decommissioning options.

Cutting Pile Sampling

As part of the decommissioning planning process, the regulatory bodies dictate that operators should analyse the drilling cuttings piles to determine the hydrocarbon and chemical content, the leach rate and to determine the physical characteristics, such as strength, density and stability of the pile.

 

Video

Brae field decommissioning

Marathon Oil began planning for the decommissioning of the Brae area facilities in 2013. This included the requirement to analyze the drill cuttings piles on all three installations. 

WATCH VIDEO

 


Frequently Asked Questions

UK Decommissioning Process

What is decommissioning?

Decommissioning involves taking offshore oil and gas infrastructure out of service, securing the wells, dismantling the structures and either reusing, recycling or disposing of in accordance with legislation.

What is the decommissioning approval process?

The Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS) regulates decommissioning of offshore oil and gas installations in the UK sector of the North Sea, using a clearly defined process stipulated by the Petroleum Act (1998). Operators must submit a Decommissioning Programme to BEIS for review, followed by a public consultation period. The UK’s international obligations on decommissioning are governed principally by the 1992 Convention for the Protection of the Marine Environment of the North East Atlantic (OSPAR Convention).

What is a decommissioning programme?

A decommissioning programme sets out the measures to decommission installations and/or pipelines and wells. The scope is developed based on extensive and wide-reaching studies and assessments that are used to evaluate the appropriate options for dealing with the oil and gas infrastructure.

What is derogation?

Derogation is an exemption from the OSPAR criteria to allow installation footings to be left in place. To determine if derogation is appropriate, a process of comparative assessment and comprehensive stakeholder engagement is conducted. Validated assessment techniques that capture safety, environmental, socio-economic, technical and economic factors are used to develop a balanced and appropriate decommissioning solution.

What is a comparative assessment?

A Comparative Assessment is used to evaluate one or more options against five principal criteria (safety, environment, technical, socio-economic and financial). A key element of Comparative Assessment is engagement with key stakeholders and subject matter experts, essential to formulate a robust comparison between options and ultimately a recommendation.

Which elements are determined by regulation?

All elements of a decommissioning project are governed by regulation, both in the planning (OSPAR, BEIS and OGA) and the safety of the activities themselves (HSE).

What are the challenges with decommissioning?

In most cases, when offshore facilities were constructed decades ago, the technical method for removal of the facilities was outweighed by the simplification of the design and installation methods. This makes the removal of the assets much more onerous and technically challenging than the installation. However, innovative thinking and technology are leading to novel solutions to overcome the majority of these challenges.

Brae Area Asset Decommissioning

Why are you decommissioning the brae area assets?

Decommissioning is a natural step in the life cycle of an oil and gas field once the source of hydrocarbon has been depleted and production is no longer economical. Marathon Oil has already extended the life of the Brae field beyond the initial projections and, after careful consideration, the only viable option is to decommission the facilities. Marathon Oil initiated planning for the decommissioning of the Brae field infrastructure in 2009.

What are your recommendations for the dps?

The Decommissioning Programmes are available on this website and provide a summary of the recommendations for the Brae Area.

Did you consider alternatives to decommissioning?

The decision to cease production was made after other hydrocarbon producing opportunities were considered unviable. Alternatives for reuse of the facilities in-situ have been considered, but, given the age of the infrastructure and location in the North Sea, there were no economically viable options.

Is there a timescale for the decommissioning?

The scope of the Brae Area decommissioning is considerable, including three fixed steel jacket platforms, three Marathon Oil operated subsea tie-backs and numerous pipelines and subsea components. Before decommissioning work can proceed, the Decommissioning Programmes must be approved by the regulatory bodies, and stakeholders must be given an opportunity to comment. It is estimated that the entire decommissioning process could take up to 20 years to complete.

Are your brae platforms still operational?

Yes. The Brae Area assets are all important elements of Marathon Oil’s production portfolio and continue to be utilised at optimum levels. Investment in these platforms continues to be made, both in line with Marathon Oil’s commitment to the highest standards of safety and also with a view to continue to extend the life of the field where possible as new technology and methods are developed.

Is decommissioning being led from the us or uk?

Based in Aberdeen, a specialist team, led by the Decommissioning Project Manager, is leading the Brae Area decommissioning. Their knowledge and expertise of the North Sea is vital to the success of the operation, with valuable support being provided by professionals in the US and worldwide.

Will this mark the end of your north sea interest?

The Brae Area is Marathon Oil’s only remaining Company-operated asset in the North Sea, but the Company also holds non-operated working interests in the Foinaven area, west of the Shetland Islands and in the Scottish Area Gas Evacuation (SAGE) terminal at St. Fergus and associated North Sea gas gathering pipeline.

What is the cost and who will be funding?

An accurate cost estimate cannot be quantified until decommissioning plans are finalised and the proposed Decommissioning Programmes are approved. Marathon Oil and its Partners are responsible for all costs associated with the decommissioning. UK Government tax relief is available for operators actively engaged in decommissioning.

What will be the economic impact to the uk?

The Brae Fields have been in production for the last 35 years and have now reached the end of their technical producing lives. During that time, the Brae Field infrastructure has created thousands of jobs, and Marathon Oil has contributed more than £1.3 billion in Corporation Tax, Supplementary Charge and Petroleum Revenue Tax.

How many wells will you have to p&a?

There are approximately 100 wells to plug and abandon (P&A).

How will you seal the wells?

The wells will be plugged and abandoned in accordance with the offshore industry standard, Oil and Gas UK Guidelines for the Suspension and Abandonment of Wells.

What percent of the structure(s) will be recycled?

It is provisionally estimated that at least 85 percent will be recycled, 10 percent reused and less than 5 percent disposed of.

Jobs/Contractors

Are jobs at risk due to the decommissioning?

The scale and complexity of any Decommissioning Programme requires additional resources to be deployed, both offshore during removal and onshore during dismantling and disposal. Marathon Oil expects that specialist skills within the decommissioning sphere will be needed in both the short and long term. This will present opportunities for both existing employees and others with expertise in the sector. Inevitably, after decommissioning is completed, there will be a reduction in the Company’s North Sea workforce.

Which contractors are involved in the programmes?

Marathon Oil will be engaging extensively with the supply chain to select those contactors who share our safety values and can offer effective and cost efficient solutions.

Stakeholder Engagement

Can stakeholders have input in the process?

Yes, Marathon Oil is committed to working with stakeholders to deliver Decommissioning Programmes that take into account the views of groups and individuals with an interest in the North Sea and associated industries. Details of the consultation process are available online, with direct contact also made with many stakeholders to ensure comprehensive input.

How have you engaged with external stakeholders?

Multiple face-to-face and workshop-based engagements have been made with stakeholders. In addition, this website was launched in 2015 and provides key information on the Brae Area and the Decommissioning Programmes. The website will continue to be updated to include pertinent developments. Marathon Oil is also committed to communicating to a wider audience during the process – through digital and traditional media – to ensure all those with an interest in the proposed Decommissioning Programmes have access to the latest information. Marathon Oil is committed to clear and open communication throughout the process.

How have you engaged with internal stakeholders?

Internal stakeholders have been provided regular updates on the decommissioning progress through weekly status reports, presentations and informational documents.

Safety

How did you assess potential safety impacts?

Marathon Oil considers safety to be the most important factor in any works that it undertakes. All decisions related to the selection of decommissioning options have included a review on the safety impacts.

Environmental Considerations

What are the environmental impacts?

Marathon Oil regards environmental stewardship as a key element of corporate responsibility and has conducted studies and assessments beyond the minimum required by regulation to better understand the short-, medium- and long-term environmental impacts of the decommissioning proposals being put forward. The conclusions reinforce the proposals that Marathon Oil have put forward to the decommissioning plans. 


Key Facts

Marathon Oil's Brae Alpha facility

Brae Alpha
Location: UK Block 16/7a, 161 miles (259 km) north-east of Aberdeen
Water depth: 112m (367 feet)
Number of platforms: 1
Production Start Date: 1983
Sub-structure weight: >20,000 tonnes (8 legged steel)
Topsides weight: 30,200 tonnes (Dry), 34,000 tonnes (Operating), 25 modules
Accommodation: 211
Height of Jacket: 123m (404 ft)

Brae Alpha Data Sheet

 

 

Marathon Oil's Brae Bravo facility

Brae Bravo
Location: UK Block 16/7a, 167 miles (269 km) north-east of Aberdeen
Water depth: 99m (326 feet)
Number of platforms: 1 (plus flare tripod)
Production Start Date: 1988
Sub-structure weight: >22,000 tonnes (8 legged steel)
Topsides weight: 36,200 tonnes (Dry), 42,000 tonnes (Operating), 28 modules
Accommodation: 191
Height of Jacket: 114m (374 ft)

Brae Bravo Data Sheet

 

 

Marathon Oil's East Brae facility

East Brae
Location: UK Block 16/3a, 175 miles (282 km) north-east of Aberdeen
Water depth: 116m (380 feet)
Number of platforms: 1
Production Start Date: 1993
Sub-structure weight: >10,000 tonnes (4 legged steel)
Topsides weight: 20,200 tonnes (Dry), 22,500 tonnes (Operating), 10 modules
Accommodation: 188
Height of Jacket: 136m (446 Ft)

East Brae Data Sheet

 

Subsea Installations

Marathon Oil's Subsea Installation in the Brae Area

Central Brae
Water depth: 105m (345 feet)
Weight: >650 tonnes
Number of Wells: 8
Distance from Host: 4.4 miles (7km) from

West Brae
Water depth: 107m (351 feet)
Weight: >140 tonnes
Number of Wells: 10 (including Sedgwick)
Distance from Host: 5.5 miles (8.8km) from Brae Alpha 

 

Braemar
Water depth: 120m (394 feet)
Weight: >20 tonnes
Number of Wells: 2 (1 suspended)
Distance from Host: 7.8 miles (12.5km) from East Brae

Flowlines/Umbilicals
Total length of flowlines: >45 miles (75km)
Total length of umbilicals: >23 miles (38km) 

Pipeline/Cables
Total length of pipelines: >120 miles (195km)
Total length of pipelines: >35 miles (57km)

SUBSEA Data Sheet

 

 

 

Important Links

BEIS website logo that references decommissioning laws relevant to Marathon Oil

Website
BEIS

Decommissioning programmes, including dates, locations, installations decommissioned, method of decommissioning and close-out reports where available.

VISIT THE SITE

 
DECOM North Sea website logo that references opportunities relevant to Marathon Oil across the oil and gas decommissioning sector

Website
Decom North Sea

Decom North Sea is the single topic, multi region membership organisation which connects capability with opportunity across the oil and gas decommissioning sector.

VISIT THE SITE

 
Oil and Gas UK website logo to help reference laws that allow Marathon Oil's offshore operations

Website
Oil & Gas UK

Oil & Gas UK is the leading representative body for the UK offshore oil and gas industry. It is a not-for-profit organisation, established in April 2007 but with a pedigree stretching back over 40 years.

VISIT THE SITE

 
DECOM North Sea website logo that references opportunities relevant to Marathon Oil across the oil and gas decommissioning sector

Website
OSPAR

OSPAR is the mechanism by which 15 Governments & the EU cooperate to protect the marine environment of the North-East Atlantic.

VISIT THE SITE

 
Supply Chain Code of Conduct logo

Oil & Gas UK
Supply Chain Code of Practice

The Supply Chain Code of Practice outlines a set of best practice guidelines and is an aspirational code of conduct to help the UK oil and gas industry.

VISIT THE SITE

 
UK Legislation website logo to help reference laws that allow Marathon Oil's operations

Website
UK Legislation

Information on the Petroleum Act passed in 1998

VISIT THE SITE